Grey Box Testing

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Grey Box Testing in SDLC

In this article, I am going to discuss Grey Box Testing in SDLC. Please read our previous article where we discussed Black Box Testing. At the end of this article, you will understand the following important pointers which are related to Grey Box Testing in SDLC.

  1. What is Grey Box Testing in SDLC?
  2. Why do we need Grey Box Testing?
  3. How to Perform Grey Box Testing in SDLC?
  4. What are the different types of techniques used in Grey Box Testing?
  5. Which tools are used in Grey Box Testing?
  6. What are the Advantages of Grey Box Testing?
  7. What are the disadvantages of Grey Box Testing?
What is Grey Box Testing in SDLC?

A software testing method called grey box testing combines aspects of black box testing and white box testing. In grey box testing, the tester has just a general understanding of how the system being tested operates on the inside. It falls somewhere between white box testing, in which the tester has complete knowledge of the internal code and structure, and black box testing, in which the tester is unaware of the internal implementation. When doing a grey box test, the tester frequently has access to a small amount of system-related data, such as design documents, architecture diagrams, or database schemas. With the help of this knowledge, the tester can create test cases and conduct tests that target particular system sections or parts that are more likely to have flaws.

Why do we need Grey Box Testing?

An approach called grey box testing incorporates aspects of both black box testing and white box testing. It entails having a general understanding of how a system or piece of software under test operates. When performing grey box testing, the tester has restricted access to details regarding the internal organization of the system, such as design documents, database schemas, or code snippets. There are various factors that make grey box testing crucial and advantageous:

  • Increased test coverage: By examining the system’s internal logic and implementation during the grey box testing phase, testers can create test cases that focus on particular sections of the code. This method increases test coverage by identifying potential flaws that would not be visible through black-box testing alone.
  • Efficient use of Resources: Resource allocation is optimized by grey box testing by concentrating on the most important components of the system. Compared to strictly black box testing, testers can prioritize their efforts depending on the internal organization and potential dangers, saving time and effort.
  • Faster bug discovery: Grey box testers can focus their hunt for errors by having access to internal data. They can speed up the bug identification process by pinpointing possible problems more precisely and rapidly by comprehending the inner workings of the system.
  • Realistic testing scenarios: Grey box testing makes it easier for testers to mimic real-world situations and interactions. They can develop test cases that simulate particular user behaviors or system states by making use of their partial knowledge of the system, giving a more thorough evaluation of the system’s performance.
  • Improved Collaboration: Collaboration between developers and testers is improved because of grey box testing. Developers can benefit from the results and insights provided by testers on the internal operations of the system by being able to better understand the sources of problems and speed up the debugging process.
How to Perform Grey Box Testing in SDLC?

Grey box testing generally involves the following steps:

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  • Choose and note inputs from the BlackBox and WhiteBox testing inputs first.
  • Determine the anticipated outputs from these chosen inputs next.
  • Third, make a list of all the main routes you’ll take when testing.
  • In order to do deep-level testing, the fourth objective is to discover sub-functions that are a component of primary functions.
  • Identifying the inputs for subfunctions is the fifth task.
  • Finding expected outputs for subfunctions is the sixth job.
  • Executing a test case for Subfunctions is part of the seventh job.
  • Verifying the accuracy of the outcome is the ninth task.
What are the different types of techniques used in Grey Box Testing?

A software testing strategy called grey box testing combines aspects of black box testing and white box testing. In grey box testing, the tester only has a vague understanding of how the system being tested operates. This enables a more focused and effective testing procedure. Here are several methods used frequently in grey box testing.

What are the different types of techniques used in SDLC Grey Box Testing?

Regression Testing:

Regression testing is a software testing approach used to ensure that updates or changes made to a software application did not result in the introduction of new flaws or the failure of current functionality. It entails retesting previously tested functionality to confirm that they are still correct after changes.

Grey box testing is a testing strategy where the tester only has a general grasp of how the software application is internally structured, such as having access to the source code. Grey box testing strategies for regression testing involve using this imperfect knowledge to direct the choice and execution of test cases.

Pattern Testing:

Grey box testing, which includes aspects of both black box and white box testing, uses the pattern testing technique. It entails locating and putting specified patterns or structures in the system or code under test to test. These patterns might be associated with data flow, control flow, or certain coding features.

The purpose of pattern testing is to run through several code pathways or scenarios that are likely to have errors. Testers can improve the efficacy and efficiency of their testing efforts by concentrating on certain patterns.

Orthogonal Array Testing:

A design methodology frequently used in software testing, particularly grey box testing, is the orthogonal array testing technique. It is an effective method for choosing a subset of test cases that offers the most coverage while using the fewest possible test cases. In grey box testing, the tester only has a vague understanding of how the system being tested operates. This information may consist of having access to the source code, design documentation, or perhaps a basic comprehension of the internal architecture of the system. Grey box testing aims to find a balance between the efficiency of black box testing (where the tester has no knowledge of the internals) and the completeness of white box testing (where the tester has complete information).

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Matrix Testing:

This testing approach is categorized as Grey Box testing. It defines all the used variables of a particular program. Variables are the components that allow values to move between areas of any program. It should be done in accordance with the specifications; otherwise, the program’s readability and speed would suffer. The matrix methodology uses the program’s used variables to find the unused and uninitialized variables and eliminate them.

Which tools are used in Grey Box Testing?

Application testing for particular purposes is designed to be done using automated testing tools. For instance, while Appium is intended to automate the testing of mobile applications, selenium is solely used to test web applications on browsers. So, the following are the various automated testing tools:

  1. Cucumber
  2. NUnit
  3. Selenium
  4. DBUnit
  5. Appium
  6. RestAssured
  7. Postman
  8. Burp Suite
  9. Chrome Dev Tools
  10. Junit
What are the Advantages of Grey Box Testing?

A software testing strategy called grey box testing combines aspects of black box testing and white box testing. It requires only knowing a portion of how the system being tested operates internally, which gives testers a better grasp of the system’s architecture, design, and implementation. The advantages of grey box testing include the following:

  • Grey box testing provides a balance between the comprehensive understanding of white box testing and the constrained understanding of black box testing. In order to create more efficient test cases, testers have access to certain internal details, such as system architecture or database structure.
  • Effective testing: Grey Box Testing limits testers’ access to the core architecture, allowing them to concentrate on vulnerable points and important sections. This effectiveness improves coverage and defect discovery, cutting down on testing time and expense overall.
  • Greater test coverage is made possible via grey box testing, which combines internal knowledge with outside viewpoints. A more thorough testing strategy might be used by testing specific modules or capabilities that are more likely to include bugs.
  • Grey box testing offers a realistic representation of how end users interact with the system. Realistic testing scenarios. When running test cases, testers can take into account user viewpoints, inputs, and anticipated results, giving a more accurate portrayal of real-world events.
  • Increased defect detection: By combining their understanding of the system’s internal operations and exterior behavior, testers can find problems that black box testing might have overlooked. As a result, there is a larger likelihood of finding important problems and security flaws.
  • Reduced false positives: Since testers are only partially familiar with the system, grey box testing reduces false positives when compared to pure black box testing. This aids in narrowing the emphasis on important problems and increases the effectiveness of defect triaging and resolution.
  • Grey box testing promotes cooperation and knowledge exchange between developers, testers, and other stakeholders. In order to improve communication and teamwork within the testing team, testers can share their knowledge and understanding of the system.
What are the disadvantages of Grey Box Testing?

A software testing method called grey box testing combines aspects of black box testing and white box testing. Grey box testing has various drawbacks in addition to its benefits, including the following:

  1. Limited visibility: The software’s internal architecture is partially accessible during grey box testing. The tester might not, however, have total access to the implementation, architecture, or underlying code details. This restricted access may make it more difficult to find some kinds of flaws.
  2. Grey box testing may not fully cover all scenarios and paths because it operates with little understanding of the internal workings of the system. This can compromise the software’s overall quality by failing to detect some flaws.
  3. Grey box testing frequently depends on documentation, such as design requirements or system documentation, in order to understand the software. The effectiveness of the testing process may be greatly impacted if the documentation is unreliable, out-of-date, or missing.
  4. Grey box testing takes more time than black box testing since it involves more study to comprehend the internal workings of the system. The testing procedure may take longer as a result of the added work, particularly when dealing with intricate or sizable software systems.
  5. Skill requirements: Technical proficiency and acquaintance with the underlying technologies are required for effective grey box testing. The ability to analyze the internal workings of the software and make defensible choices about what to test and how to test it is a skill that testers must have.
  6. Potential for bias: The tester’s preconceptions or assumptions about the software can affect the results of a grey box test. This bias can cause omissions or a failure to consider alternate circumstances, which would compromise the testing procedure’s completeness.

In the next article, I am going to discuss Data Flow Testing. Here, in this article, I try to explain Grey Box Testing in SDLC. I hope you enjoy this Grey Box Testing in SDLC article.

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